Categories
General Information on Meniere's Disease / Syndrome Meniere's Disease and Nutrition Meniere's Disease Triggers & Causes

Diabetes and Meniere’s Disease

By Mike Spencer

Founder of Meniere’s Help

Researcher and author of Managing Meniere’s Disease – How to Live Symptom Free and The Need for Balance – Dealing with the Causes of Meniere’s

Diabetes and Meniere’s Disease

What are the links between diabetes and Meniere’s disease?

Are the two connected at all, is it all coincidence or are the two a result of the same root cause in some people?

A sizable number of Meniere’s sufferers who contact Meniere’s Help also suffer from Diabetes. Glucose metabolism, and insulin irregularities have both been linked to Meniere’s in some way or another.

The biggest problem with trying to link diabetes and Meniere’s is that the huge number of people suffering from diabetes means that by law of averages there will naturally be a sizable number of people suffering from both conditions.

According to the WHO:  422 million adults worldwide have diabetes. That is 1 person in 11. While type 1 is thought of as genetic, 90% of sufferers are actually type 2.  These statistics are predicted to double over the next 2 years. Since 1980 the number of adults living with diabetes has almost quadrupled.

In the USA 2012 figures show us that at least 29.1 million Americans, or 9.3% of the population, had diabetes. 1.4 million Americans are diagnosed with diabetes every year. In 2012, 86 million Americans age 20 and older had prediabetes; this was up from 79 million in 2010. These statistics are staggering; clearly this is not going away soon.

Although the main focus on the tackling of this rise of diabetes is aimed at the obesity epidemic, and rightly so, it has to be taken into account that diabetes is on the rise in places like Asia where obesity isn’t so prevalent. The rise of forced farming practices in recent years practically runs parallel with the increase of diabetes and many other avoidable diseases.

In the 2016 WHO ‘Global Report on Diabetes’ the director general of the WHO points out that diabetes is, “No longer a disease of predominantly rich nations, the prevalence of diabetes is steadily increasing everywhere, most markedly in the world’s middle-income countries.”

The globalization of fast food chains, growing global demand for wheat grown on soils depleted of its mineral content through the overuse of NPK artificial fertilizers and the demand for overly polished rice must all play its part.

White bread can turn to glucose inside the body faster than sugar! White, polished rice can turn to glucose very quickly also if not balanced with fats or proteins. Add to this the empty carbohydrates being proudly stuffed down kids throats throughout Asia where it is a sign of wealth to go to the most unhealthy fast food chains simply because they symbolize the monetary richness of the west.

Sugary sodas, alcohol, candies and the prevalence of processed foods are all contributing greatly to this problem. This bombardment of sugars strains the pancreas so much that it cannot keep up with the demand for insulin to regulate blood sugar levels.

There are several aspects that link all of this to Meniere’s without looking at the diabetes connection itself. Firstly the pancreas is part of the endocrine system. Endocrine dysfunctions have been linked to Meniere’s. The thyroid is part of the endocrine system and has been linked to Meniere’s. T-cell regulation has been linked to Meniere’s. T-cells are regulated by the thymus which in turn is regulated by the thyroid. metabolism has been linked to Meniere’s. High triglyceride and cholesterol levels have been linked to Meniere’s.

Are you seeing a pattern here?

Diabetes and Meniere’s Disease

A multitude of studies can be found on each of the individual links stated above but very few focus on the obvious solution to most of this. Diet. It really is that simple.

What you eat and do not eat makes all the difference in every case, and of course the same is true of diabetes.

Both hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) and hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) have been linked to and investigated in Meniere’s and vestibular diseases. This suggests that any alterations in insulin can cause issues. Insulin regulates both sodium and potassium retention, something very relevant in the functioning of the inner ear.

A 2009 study in the Brazilian Journal of Otorhinolaryngology, ‘Blood glucose and insulin levels in patients with peripheral vestibular disease‘  found that:

“The four-hour glucose-insulin index showed 87.7% of patients with dizziness and suspicion of peripheral vestibular dysfunction having glucose and insulin metabolism alterations.”

The International Tinnitus Journal published a study in 2005, ‘Glucose and insulin profiles and their correlations in Ménière’s disease.’ It stated that:

“Changes in carbohydrate metabolism, admittedly one of the most prevalent etiologies of Ménière’s syndrome, can be diagnosed early by 5-hour glucose and insulin curves with a 100-g glucose load, a test more sensitive than those traditionally used in investigating impaired glucose tolerance or diabetes mellitus. This study investigated carbohydrate metabolism characteristics in 64 patients with typical Ménière’s disease. We demonstrated that 72% of them had some variable degree of hyperinsulinemia as shown by their plasma insulin curves, whereas alterations on the glucose curve (reactive hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia) were found for only 21%.”

It concluded that:

“These findings confirm the need to include 5-hour glucose and insulin curves in the diagnostic routine when investigating Ménière’s disease. In that way, an early diagnosis of hyperinsulinemia, the metabolic change most often involved in the pathogenesis of cochleovestibular disorders, can be made.”

An earlier study published in Acta Otolaryngologica in 1984, ‘Blood levels of glucose and insulin in Meniere’s disease‘ stated the following:

“It has been reported that a very commonly overlooked cause of vertigo is disorder of glucose metabolism. This may not be reflected in the glucose tolerance test alone, but becomes obvious when the insulin levels in blood are evaluated simultaneously.

Thirty-one patients with Meniere’s disease underwent a 5-hour glucose tolerance test with radioimmune assay of insulin. It was found that 67.7% of our patients showed some abnormality in the relationship between the blood levels of glucose and insulin.”

The studies above, in addition to several others connecting insulin and glucose to Meniere’s are all cited on PubMed.

More specific to diabetes is the 2013 study published on Science Direct from the Journal of Otology, ‘Effects of Diabetes on Hearing and Cochlear Structures’.

“Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic systemic disease characterized by hyperglycemia, with various pathogenic mechanisms. From absolute or relative insulin deficiency, patients with DM often demonstrate various levels of metabolic disorders. Major clinical manifestations of DM include metabolic disorders, vascular lesions, circulatory disturbances and neurologic complications. Along with advances in DM research, reports of DM related tinnitus and hearing impairment have increased continuously.

DM is closely linked to hearing damage. Both large and microscopic size blood vessels are affected in DM. Metabolic disorders, atherosclerotic changes and micro vessel diseases result in ischemia and hypoxia in neural tissues, leading to nerve damage. When such pathological changes involve the cochlea and auditory nerve, cochlear and/or neural hearing loss follows.”

Although this study does not mention ‘Meniere’s disease’ it shows us how blood flow, insulin and metabolic disorders can affect ear function.

It is a fact that Meniere’s help has received many emails from people who suffer from both Meniere’s disease and diabetes. In some cases diabetes preceded the symptoms of Meniere’s, while with others it was the other way round. So proving a link between Meniere’s and diabetes itself is hard to do. However, several of the factors that lead to diabetes can also be linked to Meniere’s.

At the end of the day, it all comes down to what you eat and do not eat. If the onset of Meniere’s is related to metabolism, endocrine disorders or thyroid dysfunction for example then the same reasons these problems occur could be the same reasons at root cause that Meniere’s symptoms manifest. Poor diet and lifestyle causes dysfunctions throughout the body that can lead to various conditions including both Meniere’s and diabetes.

We have received updates from Meniere’s sufferers in the past where, when they changed their diet, lifestyle and in many cases used a specific supplement regimen (discussed here) they not only reduced or eliminated their Meniere’s symptoms but also improved their condition related to diabetes.

This underscores the importance of the right nutrition. No remedy or drug can compensate for a poor diet. However a good healthy whole food (organic where possible) diet supported by quality supplementation can reduce the symptoms of, reverse or eliminate many conditions, Meniere’s and diabetes among them.

At precisely the same time I was writing this article The Express news paper online published a report, ‘Removing bread and pasta from diets ‘can reverse Type 2 diabetes’

Diabetes.co.uk, the world’s largest community of sufferers revealed that 7,000 Type 2 patients using a low refined carbohydrate dietary program saved £6.9 million on medication in a year. They claimed that,

“Slashing consumption of rice, potatoes and sugar has the potential to halt one of Britain’s biggest health epidemics. Switching to a healthier lifestyle could save the cash-strapped NHS £10 billion a year – the amount spent treating the condition – and change people’s lives in just 12 months.”

Co-author of the book this study is published in, Dr Aseem Malhotra said,

“The good news is it’s entirely preventable – but also reversible – and simple dietary changes through cutting refined carbohydrates can at the very least help patients come off medications. Simple diet changes have rapid and substantial benefits not just for patients with Type 2 but for high blood pressure and heart disease too.”

Charlotte Summers, of Diabetes.co.uk said,

“We are seeing phenomenal results from people taking a lifestyle first approach on the low carb program which is saving NHS budgets and lives.”

Type in “diabetes diet” or something similar into your search engine and you will find a plethora of diet plans online for diabetics.

Can type 2 diabetes be reversed?

In a simple 12-minute presentation to the U.K. Parliament, Zoe Harcombe, Ph.D., who spent years researching dietary guidelines as they relate to nutrition and obesity, succinctly demonstrates how bad science supports rising rates of diabetes and other nutritionally triggered diseases.

For Meniere’s the right diet and supplementation can help the immune system deal with the inflammation causing the symptoms. Dealing with the cause of the inflammation on the other hand often needs more than simply the correct diet. This depends on the root of the problem and there are several for you to consider.

Finding the root cause or causes of Meniere’s in your own individual case can be done though. If you find your root cause, you have found the key to your cure or solution, whichever words you choose to use. Eliminate or correct the root cause and you can overcome Meniere’s completely. This is something we have constantly seen among sufferers over the past 13 years of support work.

Finally, it is important that if you are both a diabetic and have Meniere’s you should be careful using steroids as a treatment for your Meniere’s.  Increases in blood glucose are common among people taking prednisone and other steroids. These steroids are referred to as ‘glucocorticoids’. Perhaps of even more significance is the fact that long term use of these steroids can produce “Steroid induced diabetes” and a host of other very serious conditions.

According to a study  ‘Steroid-induced diabetes‘ cited on PubMed.gov in 2014,  “Glucocorticoids have various common metabolic side effects including hypertension, osteoporosis and diabetes. As the therapeutic benefits of glucocorticoids continue to expand across medical specialties, the incidence of steroid-induced or steroid-exacerbated diabetes will continue to rise.”

There are plenty of ways to reduce inflammation naturally to tackle your Meniere’s symptoms. If you have the choice of steroids or the right foods, which will you choose?

Click here to read Managing Meniere’s Disease – How to Live Symptom Free
Click here to read The Need for Balance – Dealing with the Causes of Meniere’s

Help other Meniere’s sufferers. Do have experience with Meniere’s and diabetes? Tell us all about it in the comments boxes below or email Mike at meniereshelp@gmail.com

Related articles:

Hypoglycemia and Meniere’s disease

Metabolism and Meniere’s Disease

Cholesterol and Meniere’s Disease

Further reading:

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30661384/

Categories
General Information on Meniere's Disease / Syndrome Meniere's Disease Success Stories Meniere's Disease Triggers & Causes

Can Chiropractics cure Meniere’s disease?

By Mike Spencer

Founder of Meniere’s Help

Researcher and author of Managing Meniere’s Disease – How to Live Symptom Free and The Need for Balance – Dealing with the Causes of Meniere’s

Can chiropractics cure Meniere’s disease?

Can chiropractics cure Meniere’s disease?  For many Meniere’s sufferers it does seem to be a solution. 

After being told by three separate doctors that she had Meniere’s disease and being given the usual mix of diuretics and Serc (betahistine), nobody mentioned to Ana how she could actually free herself of Meniere’s completely, only treat it. Which of course they very rarely do.

The things that can actually help you overcome Meniere’s completely are not usually on the radar of the average ENT’s or audiologist. The reasons for that are clear. They have been taught that there is no known cure for Meniere’s and no known cause.

The mere mention of the word ‘cure’ seems controversial and invites much skepticism, which says a lot about modern medical culture. So then, let’s say ‘solution’ to appease those with the ‘treatment’ mentality.

The truth is, there is no known definitive cause or cure. When mainstream medicine comes to understand that there are several known possible causes and many contributing factors, then by going through the check list of these possibilities they can indeed identify and deal with the root cause (or causes) in each individual case. 

For a multitude of reasons, do not expect this to be happening anytime soon.  Each ‘specialist’ will be compartmentalized in their own specific field and the big picture will usually be obscured to them. Teaching at medical schools is very much focused on the ‘treating‘ of conditions such as Meniere’s with drugs and possibly surgery.

With huge pharmaceutical corporations funding so many medical schools and with their influence so powerful in federal and governmental ‘authorities‘, do not expect definitive ‘cures’ to be found anytime soon for anything. Treatments and perpetual writing of prescriptions are good for business; cures are not. As sad as it is to say, it is as simple as that. We live in a world where ‘profits’ for shareholders is everything.

But the causes are there and therefore so are the cures.

Each individual case of Meniere’s disease may be slightly different, sometimes very different in its overall pathology or root cause. The need soon becomes very apparent for the sufferer to identify their own cause and deal with it accordingly.

If you have been told, “There is nothing more to be done, take the drugs and learn to live with it” then of course it is down to you to take things into your own hands.

Learn how to do this by reading: The Need for Balance – Dealing with the Causes of Meniere’s

In Ana’s case, she was lucky enough to find her root cause within months and now says she feels cured.

Here below is her first email (used with permission):

In Ana’s case she found her cause to be related to neck issues. Excerpt from Ana’s mail:

“I want to share my experience. I am a Mexican 40 years old mother of two kids. I was diagnosed with Menieres early April, I had a very strong vertigo episode, lost 30% of hearing and had this noise on my left ear. I was with the medicine for almost three months (Serc, and a diuretic), of course no sodium, no alcohol, very little caffeine.

I read your page in April and saw all the alternative medicine but I am a University teacher so I had to wait until the semester was over to have some time and go visit the chiropractic. And as soon as I went to the first visit I felt the change, I stop taking the medicines and I eat normal, no sodium restriction, I have not exaggerated but eat normal food and feel great.

My ears are perfect, I am back to me.

I would not had visited the chiropractic if it wasn’t for your information so Thank you very very much! You guys gave me back my life. I wish more people would know about this, because I visited three doctors and they didn’t tell me anything about this possibility and I know they didn’t know because two of them were my relatives.

Thanks a lot!”

I asked Ana if I could use her story on this blog to encourage other sufferers. Below is her response:

“Hi Mike,

Sure please do so. And send a huge hug to the person that wrote about the chiropractic….I didn’t find it anywhere else.
I have a PhD in biotechnology so I am used to read scientific literature, but when it is about myself it is kind of depressing read stuff about Meniere, so I was reading slowly to try no to be overwhelmed. I still can’t believe that none of the three doctors that I visited (and gave me the same Meniere diagnosis) told me about the possibility of having a problem in the cervical vertebrae and that it was possible to fix it. One told me it was probably because I ate too much salt, the other because of too much stress, and the other one it was probably autoimmune, and I believed that it was probably caused because of a medicine (domperidone) that I took and there are two cases that relate it to menieres in the FDA . But I read you article which was straight to the point and started to do a check list on the alternative medicines. Not just mentioning “life style modifications” which I found in other articles and wonder…. WHAT life style modifications. So thank you thank you!

I wish more people knew about the chiropractic and find that solution. Probably that is not the case for all… but it is worth to try it, and of course to go with someone that knows how to treat it, probably not all chiropractics would know how to treat it but this guy is very good.

Million thanks!

Ana Leal”

The point of posting Ana’s story is to encourage you the sufferer to understand Meniere’s is not as hopeless as you may have been led to believe. On the contrary, you CAN overcome this condition completely.

Cervical spine misalignment may or may not be relative to your own condition. If it is, it is important that you get checked by a reputable cervical certified chiropractor or osteopath. This can be fixed. Ana’s story is not uncommon. We often get mails from sufferers who have found this to be their root cause, fixed it and overcome Meniere’s.

Kelly from Michigan in the US emailed Meniere’s Help with a similar story a few months ago.

Kelly read both of my books Managing Meniere’s Disease and The Need for Balance and we had also corresponded before I received an email from her with her story:

 

During our correspondence it was clear that Kelly was aware she had both allergies and neck issues.  Kelly dealt both with her allergies and neck issues to free herself of Meniere’s symptoms. She wrote,

“I did some research on Meniere’s & found you (Thank God). I made an appointment with an Allergist & an Atlas Orthogonist. They have both helped me tremendously. I found out I am allergic to dust mites, feathers, cats, dogs, ragweed, weeds, grass pollen, cockroach, molds, tree pollen and pine. The Dr put me on allergy medicine and a nasal spray. I haven’t felt dizzy or had a headache since

In regards to her neck issues, she was shown on her MRI where the nerve was being pinched & the blood flow was being cut off.  She went on to say,

“When I went to the back doctor she discovered I have C1/C2 misalignment, loss of cervical curve, herniated discs in cervical spine. In her words, “You’re one twisted girl”. My x-rays show how tilted my head is. It’s leaning to the right. You can also see on my MRI where the nerve is being pinched & the blood flow is being cut off. I’m on a 3 month treatment plan which includes cervical decompression & cold laser therapy. So far so good. This is the best I’ve felt in a year. Thank you so much for pointing me in the right direction.”

Neck and spinal issues are very common in Meniere’s sufferers, especially C1 and C2 but often further down the spine too. Kelly’s atlas bone being out of alignment and her shoulder being pulled down was very similar to my own case. Although I had lived for 10 years 95% symptom free through dietary changes and supplementation ( I still had slight tinnitus and deafness), it wasn’t until I saw an excellent chiropractor in Japan in 2012 and had my neck misalignment corrected that I was totally freed of Meniere’s and finally regained my hearing. I could no longer just say I was symptoms free, but I could say in fact that I was now fully ‘cured‘.

Kelly’ most recent email to me read:

“Mike, I would love for you to share my story. If it can help just one person that would be awesome. I still cannot believe how great I feel. I feel like my old self again. Which I thought that person was gone forever. I just can’t thank you enough. (My husband thanks you too). So yes, you have my permission to share my story.”

Cervical spine issues may or may not be relevant to your own individual Meniere’s case. If this is not the case with you then there are several other possibilities for you to consider, make a check list and get checked for.

Once you have identified what is relevant to you, you have the keys to your ‘solution’. Knowledge is useless though unless you, yourself, take the appropriate action.

Click here to read The Need for Balance – Dealing with the Causes of Meniere’s 

Do not let lack of knowledge or lack of belief cause you to suffer one day more. You too can soon be saying “I am back to me and feel great” or ” I feel like my old self“.

So can Chiropractics cure Meniere’s disease?

It certainly seems a solution for many sufferers. 

Help other Meniere’s sufferers: Have you successfully overcome Meniere’s or do you have experience with Meniere’s and cervical spine? Tell us all about it in the comments boxes below or email Mike at meniereshelp@gmail.com

Chiropractics for Meniere’s disease

Mike’s Meniere’s Story

Meniere’s Disease and Cervical Spine

Further reading:

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/21629395/

Categories
Meniere's Disease Triggers & Causes Meniere's Disease and Nutrition

Cholesterol and Meniere’s Disease

By Mike Spencer

Founder of Menieres Help

Researcher and author of Managing Meniere’s Disease – How to Live Symptom Free and The Need for Balance – Dealing with the Causes of Meniere’s

Cholesterol and Meniere’s Disease

If you eat a high fat, high carbohydrate and/or a sugary diet cholesterol could be depositing plaque on your blood vessel walls. If this is the case, then your blood flow could be restricted. Poor blood flow in and around the ear is the very opposite to what you want. The ear needs a smooth flow of blood in and out of the ear or complications can occur. If you suffer from Meniere’s disease, then high cholesterol could be making things a lot worse for you.

Triglycerides

High triglyceride counts may be significant for the same reason. Large numbers of people suffering from Meniere’s are found to have elevated cholesterol and triglyceride levels.  The deeper significance of this as a causal factor may be misleading in that the average diet and lifestyle in most industrialized countries now produces a population that will often have these elevated levels but not everyone suffers from Meniere’s.

In addition to this, most Meniere’s patients will be on diuretics such as hydrochlorothiazide. One side effect of these drugs can be an increase in triglycerides and low density lipoprotein (LDL) or ‘bad’ cholesterol.

On the other hand, as you will read in the last section of this article, high triglycerides may be a sign of other dysfunctions within the body that can indeed impact on the condition of a Meniere’s sufferer.

For 50 years doctors have been telling patients that eggs increased cholesterol, but an extensive study published in JAMA ( Journal for the American medical association) in 2014 showed that it turns out that advice was wrong and that excess sugar in fact is much worse for cholesterol. The study highlighted soda as one of the biggest culprits.

Regardless, plaque buildup can affect blood flow. Blood flow is very important. While build up of cholesterol can also trigger the immune system into an inflammatory response. Inflammation is a major reason for Meniere’s symptoms. See more on why inflammation is an important factor here.

The right nutrition to help the immune system fight inflammation and promote blood flow has produced the best results in reducing symptoms of Meniere’s that we have seen. We have constantly seen all the evidence of this for 13 years. While the two most recent drugs to be lauded as treatments for Meniere’s, OTO-104 and SPI-1005  are aimed at ‘reducing inflammation.’

In addition to this, researchers at the University of Colorado claim they may have a plan to “disable” Meniere’s Disease through ‘improving blood flow.

So you have the choice of reducing inflammation and increasing blood flow naturally or by using drugs. Either way, whether you have Meniere’s or not, it is acknowledged by almost everyone now that reducing ‘bad’ cholesterol is a wise choice for your general health.

Cholesterol and Meniere’s Disease

PLAQUE

Plaque is a collection of excess cholesterol covered by a scar that is deposited on artery walls. In most cases, this buildup results after years of having high cholesterol. The largest buildups are most likely to cause angina. Small buildups of this substance are thought to be unstable and more likely to rupture, releasing their contents into the bloodstream, possibly causing a blood clot that may trigger a heart attack.

What Is Plaque?
When talking about cholesterol, it is helpful to understand plaque. The effect of plaque buildup in the arteries is the main cause of heart disease, heart attacks in people with high cholesterol and many other ‘health’ conditions.

How Does It Develop?

Cholesterol is a major ingredient in the plaque that builds up in the arteries.

Excess cholesterol is deposited on the artery walls as it travels through the bloodstream. Then, special cells in the artery wall gobble up this excess cholesterol, creating a “bump” in the artery wall. This cholesterol-rich “bump” then is covered by a scar that produces a hard coat or shell over the cholesterol and cell mixture. It is this collection of cholesterol covered by a scar that is called plaque. The buildup of plaque is known as atherosclerosis

Impact of Plaque

The plaque buildup narrows the space in the coronary arteries through which blood can flow, decreasing the supply of oxygen and nutrients to the heart. If not enough oxygen-carrying blood can pass through the narrowed arteries to reach the heart muscle, the heart may respond with a pain called angina. The pain is often felt during exercise, when the heart needs more oxygen. It is typically felt in the chest or sometimes in other places, like the left arm and shoulder. This same inadequate blood supply, however, may cause no symptoms.

This plaque buildup does not occur over days, weeks, or months. Plaque buildup, in most cases, occurs over many years. If the heart is not receiving oxygen and nutrients, therefore not functioning as it should, then blood flow throughout the body will not be as it should. If there is a constriction in the veins and capillaries in and around the ear for some other reason then the added burden of plaque both in the coronary arteries and elsewhere will only compound the problem.

Reducing Plaque Buildup

Lowering cholesterol levels can slow, stop, or even reverse the buildup of plaque. This can reduce your risk of a heart attack by lowering the cholesterol content in unstable plaque, making it more stable and less prone to rupture. This is why lowering your LDL cholesterol is such an important part of reducing your risk of a heart attack. In the bigger picture, the same may go for reducing the risk of increased Menieres symptoms or even eliminating your symptoms, depending on your root cause.

Reducing triglycerides

To reduce your triglyceride levels, limit high starch foods, reduce or cut bad fats, reduce sugar intake, limit alcohol intake, limit fructose, eat omega 3 rich foods such as fish and nuts and limit refined carbohydrates such as white bread.

In fact one of the most commonly overlooked causes of high triglyceride levels is too many carbohydrates, especially in heavily refined foods. If your triglyceride levels are elevated, it can likely represents a severe abnormality of insulin balance in your body.

This is important in more ways than one. It is known that insulin in diabetics creates a sodium retaining effect. Insulin is involved in the regulation of both sodium and potassium. Both relevant to inner ear function.

So this takes us way beyond simply worrying about cholesterol. Now we are concerned with metabolism, glucose and insulin. A study published in The International Tinnitus Journal and PubMed in 2005 ‘Glucose and insulin profiles and their correlations in Ménière’s disease.’  highlighted this fact.

Quote:

“This study investigated carbohydrate metabolism characteristics in 64 patients with typical Ménière’s disease. We demonstrated that 72% of them had some variable degree of hyperinsulinemia as shown by their plasma insulin curves, whereas alterations on the glucose curve (reactive hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia) were found for only 21%. More advanced hyperinsulinemic conditions (i.e., glucose intolerance or diabetes mellitus) were usually associated with changes in lipid profiles and with a central pattern of fat distribution and systemic hypertension.”

In an earlier study it was found that:

67.7% of our patients showed some abnormality in the relationship between the blood levels of glucose and insulin.”

You can read about Metabolism and Meniere’s here

Sugars not metabolized into energy within the body are stored as fats. Unused fats are stored as fats. Carbohydrates turn to sugars, the sugar not used is stored as fat. Highly refined carbohydrates give a sugar rush to the body and cause insulin irregularities. Insulin irregularities can cause sodium and potassium level irregularities.

You can see how everything is connected within the body and how seemingly unrelated issues may either result in Meniere’s symptoms or at least influence in some way what is happening within your ear.

Good blood flow is important to prevent Meniere’s symptoms. Anything affecting this is most likely affecting your Meniere’s condition. Anything that triggers inflammation is most likely affecting your Meniere’s condition and anything that is causing imbalances in the regulation of the electrolytes sodium and potassium and metabolism is most likely affecting your Meniere’s condition.

The root causes and triggers of any health condition can often be found not in the actual organ affected but rather elsewhere in the body.

What can you take away from this? Quite simply a good balanced diet, high in nutritious whole foods and very low on health damaging processed foods is not just some fanciful idea or a passing fad. It is essential for both overall health and to the Meniere’s sufferer specifically.

Click here to read Managing Meniere’s Disease – How to Live Symptom Free
Click here to read The Need for Balance – Dealing with the Causes of Meniere’s

Help other Meniere’s sufferers. Tell us all about your experiences with cholesterol and Meniere’s. Use the comments boxes below or email Mike at meniereshelp@gmail.com

Related articles:

Hypoglycemia and Meniere’s disease

Diabetes and Meniere’s Disease

Mike’s Meniere’s Story

Further reading:

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/5943955/

Categories
General Information on Meniere's Disease / Syndrome Meniere's Disease and Nutrition Meniere's Disease Triggers & Causes

Fasting with Meniere’s Disease

How does fasting affect your condition when you suffer with Meniere’s Disease?

By Mike Spencer

Founder of Menieres-Help.Com

Researcher and author of Managing Meniere’s Disease – How to Live Symptom Free and The Need for Balance – Dealing with the Causes of Meniere’s

Fasting with Meniere’s disease, is it a good idea? Can it help or can it make things worse?

What you eat and do not eat, the regularity and size of your meals can make a difference both positively and negatively if you are a Meniere’s sufferer. 

Dietary considerations are important for the Meniere’s sufferer and there are many posts and articles on this blog and the main site (Menieres-Help.Com) related to this. (see bottom of page for links)

I recently received two emails that both mentioned fasting, one suggesting it produced good results while the other suggested it might have affected her condition in a negative way.

Fasting with Meniere’s disease

Positive:

Hey Michael,
I’m doing pretty good. I’m taking more of the grape seed extract to stop dizziness. And thankfully it does help me. I have cut salt out of diet even with prepared foods. Sodium is so my enemy. I fasted for 3 days recently and had no dizziness at all. So I know it is food. I continue to be careful. God I miss potato chips.
I recently realized that I may be harboring candida yeast in my body–saliva test positive…….
Thanks very much for asking after me. I do appreciate your emails.

Negative:

Mike,

Thanks for answering. I kept telling the doctor this thing started out in my digestive system. I had very minor symptoms at the time in regards to hearing, and then the vertigo was so slight as to be interesting is all. But the GI system was definitely an issue, but I tended to dismiss it in hopes it would pass.
I noticed the diet link from the outset, and remember telling the doctor I felt fine when I fasted and/or went longer periods in between meals. Unfortunately that has changed a bit now, and fasting became a bit of a problem in that it induces the menieres. that nausea and such was he precursor to any vertigo/dizziness, and not the result of it. I had neck tension that accompanied it, and at one point the tension and vertigo hit simultaneously or in concert, and the tension so powerful that it virtually strangled blood supply to the back of the head. You could tell by when it wore off, the tingling of circulation resuming. that cycle has stopped for now, but I’ve noticed a hint of it again, and the associated GI issues are popping up again. I’ve been keeping a log of sorts as to my diet and symptoms for a little short of 6 weeks now. Although I’ve detected some interesting information, I still haven’t got a definitive culprit yet.

On the one hand, if toxicity were an issue, gut problems or food allergies were present it would seem logical that fasting could help detox and as a result help the symptoms of Meniere’s. On the other hand, it is recommended that Meniere’s sufferers keep to regular eating times and not overindulge.

In terms of clinical studies I only found one listed that was any way related to fasting and Meniere’s on PubMed.gov dated 2006:

‘The effect on health of alternate day calorie restriction: eating less and more than needed on alternate days prolongs life.’

In the study it was stated that,

“Restricting caloric intake to 60-70% of normal adult weight maintenance requirement prolongs lifespan 30-50% and confers near perfect health across a broad range of species.”

It went on to state,

Since May 2003 we have experimented with alternate day calorie restriction, one day consuming 20-50% of estimated daily caloric requirement and the next day ad lib eating, and have observed health benefits starting in as little as two weeks, in insulin resistance, asthma, seasonal allergies, infectious diseases of viral, bacterial and fungal origin (viral URI, recurrent bacterial tonsillitis, chronic sinusitis, periodontal disease), autoimmune disorder (rheumatoid arthritis), osteoarthritis, symptoms due to CNS inflammatory lesions (Tourette’s, Meniere’s) cardiac arrhythmias (PVCs, atrial fibrillation), menopause related hot flashes.

This may be of greater significance than realized at first glance as, although Meniere’s is mentioned directly, it also mentions conditions that have been linked to Meniere’s: seasonal allergies, viral, fungal and bacterial infections, sinusitis and autoimmune disorders.

Regular fasting in general is believed to be very beneficial to human health.

Dr  Ed Group of the Global Healing Center explains the benefits of fasting for health in general, while some points can be directly related to Meniere’s. (see the emboldened below)

“Therapeutic fasting dates back to Hippocrates, who prescribed it for many ailments. At the time, it was the only successful way to reduce seizures in epileptic children and remained so until the 20th century.

Many people find that fasting sharpens their mind and provides mental clarity. Interestingly, many of the benefits of fasting don’t result directly from fasting itself, but from the effects of reduced calorie intake, decreased fat composition, better sleep, less diet-related inflammation, and lower intake of salt.

Blood pressure tends to fall during the fasting state, primarily during the first week of fasting. This effect seems to result from a lower salt intake and a detoxification of accumulated salt through the urine. Since excess sodium causes your body to retain water, lower sodium levels lead to better fluid balance in your tissues.

Fasting and calorie restriction inhibits the production of free radicals and irritating proteins like inflammatory cytokines.

Fasting triggers the recycling of old white blood cells—the cells that comprise much of your immune system. Recycling these immune cells leads to a more competent immune system. It works by triggering the regeneration of the stem cells that become your platelets, red blood cells, and white blood cells when you begin eating again.

Researchers found that the effects of fasting on blood sugar and insulin levels also improves the brain’s response to mental stress and protects it from stress-related damage.”

Fasting is not starvation and there are many types of fasting depending your required results or reason for doing so.

The obvious problem for some with Meniere’s may be the need to eat at regular intervals. I did not find much in terms of fasting from the 9000 odd emails to Meniere’s Help from sufferers, so I posed a simple question in three online Meniere’s groups on FB.

The responses were an interesting mix of positive and negative experiences with some somewhat neutral, though not all were from experiences of what you might call true fasting, and not fasting related to Meniere’s, they were revealing none the less:

Question posted: “Has anybody tried fasting? What were your experiences, positive or negative?”

Positive comments:

“I don’t eat a lot as it is and I have never had a problem with fasting.”

“It definitely helps me, however I haven’t found any food triggers. It’s mainly stress and poor sleep that affect me.”

“If the MD in you has an autoimmune component, it should help. If it helps, then when you reintroduce the trigger foods, the MD will rear its ugly head again. Keep a food dairy. That will help you identify the food triggers.”

“I only eat fresh fruits and vegetables, and meat. Mostly chicken and turkey. I do not eat processed foods, fast foods, carbs, sugar and limit sodium intake and caffeine. I drink a gallon and a half of water every day. I exercise riding a stationary bike and lifting weights. With this and the meds I am taking…I am attack and dizzy free now for going on 3 weeks. Was having 1-2 attacks everyday for a month.”

“I do an intermittent fast once in a while. About 500 calories for the day. However, I try to maintain my sodium levels throughout the day for consistency. I drink an electrolyte drink to help with this. I’m doing well with it!”

“I do a fasting diet and it is ok if I’m careful and plan my food and day well. If I take some time off the diet I struggle for the first week back on it so have to do it gradually, e.g. instead of going straight back to a 500 calories day I’ll do some 800 calories days first

(It’s the 5:2 diet, 500 calories 2 days a week and eat normally the rest of the time)”

“I had to fast last week for a medical procedure. Clear liquid diet for 24 hours. I got a headache but no other problems at all.”

“I do fast with MD. Key is to Drink lots of water with electrolytes. If you are going to fast for more than 24 hours, break your fast every 12 with a snack. It’s not recommended to fast more than three days for even a healthy person. This is a true fast. I do this once a month for religious purposes. Of course, there are times, when it’s just not possible.”

“I have an attack… I cut way back on my foot intake only eating very low sodium and next to nothing in general. This seems to make my hearing and symptoms better.”

Negative Comments:

“If I don’t eat something, it seems to make my Menieres worse”

“I used to fast but since menieres do not anymore. Body just doesn’t cope I get very dizzy etc”

“I would be extremely sick were I to fast.”

“I get dizzy if I miss lunch x”

“I wouldn’t try it x”

“I have bad eating habits. Low blood sugar triggered me.”

“I used to be able to fast when I was initially diagnosed about 8 years ago but in the last 3 years or so I can’t fast. I take Serc three times daily and found that I must keep hydrated and eat timelously otherwise my symptoms increase e.g. Pressure in my ears”.

“I can’t fast, I get so dizzy and nausea”

“Very bad”

“I eat as soon as I get up, & take my meds. Or I will……”

“I have to eat regularly, otherwise I feel quite poorly”

“I can’t. If I go too long between meals I will get a vertigo attack.”

reply to above: “Same for me”

“I have to do this on Thursday…. I am concerned. I always get the spins from not eating”

“I have tried twice to have a colonoscopy, but the prep from it – liquids only – made me so sick with vertigo that I won’t be able to have it done. I, too, start feeling off if I haven’t eaten for a long time.”

Neutral Comments:

“I haven’t fasted since MD started.”

“No haven’t tried fasting. Like food too much, but what I eat affects me and if I eat too much with indigestion I become off balance and very sick with lots of burping and then I pee a lot. Body trying to eliminate. Probably need a diuretic bit I feel totally drained and exhausted when I take them bit when I get attack I pee every 5 minutes. It’s the body’s way of telling me you have excess fluid.”

“I am on a very low calorie diet and sometimes I get quite dizzy.”

“I had to when the doctors where trying to figure out why I was so fatigued. It didn’t really effect me. The only problem I had was migraines from detoxing from caffeine. If you do it under doctor’s order it should effect you but everyone is different.”

“It affects all of us differently. If you choose to fast take it easy, increase water intake and decrease sodium.”

“I tried fasting to see if food made me feel worse in the afternoons. It didn’t affect my symptoms one way or the other. But it was only one day.”

“Patients are recommended to eat small meals several times per day. I think blood sugar levels can bring on attacks.”

“I have to eat rite away fasting is done otherwise I’m not in good shape”

“Several small meals seems to be the best for me. Not eating frequently enough is a trigger and heavy meals make me very tired. I have been tested numerous times for diabetes including testing at home but blood sugar is OK.”

What can be taken away from this?

Well it is known already that diet can be vitally important with Meniere’s and gut issues and food allergies can play a role in some people. We have long established that everyone is different, with differing general health states, fitness levels, contributing conditions, environments and mental states. Hence the mixed bag of comments above.

Fasting as a means of improving your condition would depend on many other aspects in your life, not just the fact you have Meniere’s.  The possibility should be considered that if true fasting were to take place over a 3 day period for example, it may be that symptoms could get worse before getting better.

I think it is safe to say that always keeping hydrated is very important.

The advice given in one comment above is sound, and that is it should be done under professional supervision or with at least a good knowledge of what you are doing.

There are several types of fasting.

Diagnostic Fast: On the advice of a doctor before surgery or blood test etc.

Dry Fast: dry fasting involves not eating or drinking anything during the fasting period. Considering the need to stay hydrated for the Meniere’s sufferer, this would seem not advisable.

Liquid Fast or Water Fast: only drink fluids and avoid eating solid foods.

Juice Fast: Juice cleansing, is a type of liquid fast lasting 3-5 days. It’s usually conducted with detoxification or weight loss in mind. Juice fasts include organic, cleansing fruit and vegetable juices.

Partial Fast: The two kinds of partial fasting are: 1. similar to liquid fasting except you may eat small amounts of solid food. 2. excludes certain foods for an extended period. Many people give up carbohydrates, alcohol, or red meat during this fast.

Intermittent Fast: Alternating periods of fasting and eating. There are many ways to conduct an intermittent fast.

Alternate-day Fast: fast for at least 24 hours. Some people choose to extend alternate-day fasts up to 36 hours. Make sure to drink plenty of water or healthy fluids in an alternate-day fast.

Extended Fasting: Extended fasts are usually 48 hours without eating, but they can last up to a week or longer.

Ketogenic Fast: Ketogenic fasts push your body into the fat burning state known as ketosis. A ketogenic fast is similar to a partial fast in that it includes a small amount of food. The two differ in the types of food consumed. On a ketogenic fast, you only consume fatty foods to shift your body into ketosis.

Click here to read Managing Meniere’s Disease – How to Live Symptom Free
Click here to read The Need for Balance – Dealing with the Causes of Meniere’s

 

Help Other Meniere’s sufferers. Do you have experience with fasting and Meniere’s disease? Tell us all about it in the comments box below or email Mike at meniereshelp@gmail.com

 

Related articles:

Further reading:

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/316014/

Categories
Meniere's Disease Triggers & Causes General Information on Meniere's Disease / Syndrome

Meniere’s Disease or Chiari malformation?

By Mike Spencer

Founder of Menieres-Help.Com.

Researcher and author of Managing Meniere’s Disease – How to Live Symptom Free, The Need for Balance – Dealing with the Causes of Meniere’s and The Meniere’s Help Reports Ten Part Series

Meniere’s Disease or Chiari malformation?

In my books I cover at length the idiopathic nature of MD and the fact that ‘Meniere’s’ is simply a label for a set of symptoms, the root cause of which can vary from person to person. Identifying the root cause or causes in your individual case and correcting or eliminating these from your life can free you from Meniere’s disease completely.

I recently received an email from the husband of a long term Meniere’s sufferer looking for answers. His wife had recently had a drop attack and ended up in hospital where she was diagnosed with ‘Type 1 Chiari Malformation’.

In a four year study of 364 Chiari patients (http://asap.org/index.php/medical-articles/four-year-study-of-chiari-i-malformation/) it was found that 74% patients had “Meniere’s like syndrome “: dizziness, disequilibrium pressure in ears, tinnitus, decreased hearing, true vertigo and nystagmus.

This would perhaps be of particular interest to Meniere’s sufferers who also suffer from Migraines as Chiari often results in headaches.

Muskuloskeletal imbalances in the back, neck or jaw are commonly found root causes of Meniere’s symptoms. After correction or treatment in most cases symptoms are reduced or eliminated altogether. The reason that in some cases symptoms are not 100% eliminated may be that there is more than one root cause present in addition to long term damage to hearing nerves.

As I point out in The Need for Balance and back up with scientific medical data, statistics and the experiences of sufferers, there may be more than one cause in each individual case. So it is important to cover all possibilities and deal with them accordingly.

The connection to Meniere’s and mukuloskeletal imbalances such as in the spine is often dismissed by mainstream medicine however the data proves otherwise. In the four year study of Chiari it was found that, in all 364 patients the most common and reliable finding was compression of the CSF spaces posterior and lateral the cerebellum.

Chiari patients are often not aware of the problem. Meniere’s sufferers are often not aware they have neck or spine issues. When chiropractic manipulation is not successful in reducing Meniere’s symptoms in those aware of neck problems, it may be prudent to get checked for Chiari.

According to Mayo clinic Chiari malformation type I occurs when the section of your skull containing a part of your brain (cerebellum) is too small or is deformed, thus putting pressure on and crowding your brain. The lower part, or tonsils, of the cerebellum are displaced into your upper spinal canal.

Dr. Thomas Milhorat, Professor and Chairman of Neurosurgery University of NY, Brooklyn explains things slightly differently:

“CSF [Cerebrospinal fluid] that is compressed has to go somewhere. In man, under normal conditions, we secrete spinal fluid. We can increase that secretion but we cannot decrease it. It happens at .37 cc every minute of our lives. When we’re upright, sleeping, running, resting. We produce 500 cc a day. It’s formed in the ventricles, circulates down through the 3rd ventricle into the aqueduct of Sylvius, into the 4th ventricle. It exits and then it surrounds all the structures of the nervous system. There is a watery bath between brain, spinal cord, cerebellum and the inner table of the skull. In Chiari patients there is reduced volume. Where does it go? Some of it is distributed up into the head, squeezed up and some is squeezed down and this may very well contribute to the formation of SM in some patients. We believe this displacement of spinal fluid into the cranial cavity may be a suitable explanation for the typical Chiari Symptoms. Distribution of CSF out of the posterior fossa into the semi-circular canals can produce in some a sea-sickness syndrome- dizziness, disequilibrium, pressure in the ears, tinnitus, and so forth. It appears to all begin with a too small posterior fossa that compresses the spinal fluid at the back of the head.

Direct bony pressure can also produce complaints. If the compression of the skull is too great, if the retroflexed odontoid (basilar impression) is too great you can have direct compression of cranial nerves or even brainstem. That can produce problems with swallowing, sleep apnea, hoarseness, tremors, and palpitations. Symptoms of Chiari I appear to be due to two basic phenomena that share in common a small back of the skull, a bony dysplagia of the base of the skull and cervical-medullary junction. These are increase of CSF pressure both in the head and in the spinal canal and direct compression of nervous structures. It is not a malformation of the brain itself.”

You can take three things from this article. One, that Chiari should be on your list of possible root causes to investigate. Two, musculoskeletal imbalances are a very real possibility for you to consider despite the ignorance and dismissive attitude of some within the ENT community and three, the list of various root cause of Meniere’s are very real and can be dealt with.

Click here to read Managing Meniere’s Disease – How to Live Symptom Free
Click here to read The Need for Balance – Dealing with the Causes of Meniere’s

So are your symptoms from Meniere’s disease or Chiari malformation?

It would seem Chiari malformation is quite rare and there are many other reasons you may be suffering the symptoms of Meniere’s. That said it may be worth getting checked for this possibility.

Help other Meniere’s sufferers. Do you have experience with neck/spine issues and Meniere’s or Chiari? Tell us all about it in the comment boxes below or email Mike at meniereshelp@gmail.com

Chiropractics for Meniere’s disease

Meniere’s disease – Cervical Spine and TMJ

Mike’s Meniere’s Story

Further reading:

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30610307/

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